The Year of the Women

On November 6th recently, after the midterm election, over 100 women will serve in Congress including 31 new members who come from more diverse background. Among them are two Muslim women, two Native American women and two first African-American women elected to Congress from Massachusetts and Connecticut. The election became a history for my eldest daughter who voted for the first time. At first, she was worried because on the day of election she would be away at her college in Massachusetts. So I helped her getting to know about the absentee ballots. People who can’t come to vote at their local voting stations can send their vote beforehand by mail. My daughter did that. She sent me text telling me that she dropped off the ballot in the mail box in her campus a couple of days before November 6th. I was so proud.

The recent midterm election became more significant because of the situation that we’ve been having for the past two years. I’m not going to indulge in mentioning name or names or whatever that has happened. But making a note about the turn out of the recent election which showed the strength of the women’s voice. It is one of the milestones for American women in the history of fighting for the rights to vote. I somehow connected the midterm election to my experience visiting Seneca Falls where the first Women’s Rights Convention was held. During our trip to Upstate New York a while back, we passed by the town of Seneca Falls. We came there actually to see the Eerie Canal, but we found out that Seneca Falls has important part in the fight for women’s rights. The first Women’s Right Convention was held there between July 19th – 20th, 1848, at Wesleyan Chapel.

When we arrived at the sight where the first convention happened, unfortunately the place was closed. From outside, though, I could see the inside of Wesleyan Chapel where Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Mary M’Clintock, Martha Coffin Wright and Jane Hunt called on women to fight for their Constitutional right to equality as U. S. citizen. They came up with 11 resolutions that demanded women be placed as equal as men. The 9th resolution was viewed as the most controversial, which said,

“to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise or the right to vote”.

However, the women’s fight to get their rights be acknowledged was a long one, especially the fight for the right to vote. From that, women’s suffrage was born. At last, on August 26th, 1920, the 19th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution was certified. Then, on November 2nd, 1920, as much as 8 millions women across the country gave their votes in election for the first time. Now, there are more women being elected to sit in the legislative sector in U.S. and that is one achievement the women of Seneca Falls Convention would be so proud of.

The 19th Amendment of U.S. Constitution:

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex”.

(For my daughters Emily & Audrey).

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Point of Interest: Harry Potter’s Library at Cornell University

My first thought when I entered this library was that this is Harry Potter’s library,although , it’s not. This marvelous library is Andrew Dickson White Library at Cornell University. But by the time you see the pictures I took and post here, you will agree this library could be Harry Potter’s library (minus the flying books). A.D. White Library is a library within a library, it’s located inside Uris Library. My family and I were visiting Cornell and my friend, Danny and his wife, took us to see several point of interests around campus. Uris Library opened in 1891 and among the oldest and beautiful libraries of American colleges. William Henry Miller was the architect who designed the building. It is a magnificent building with a clock tower attached to it that becomes Cornell’s symbol. The McGraw Tower is another point of interest at Cornell that plays chimes concert daily.

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White was co-founder and Cornell University first president. When Harold D. Uris Library was established, White wanted to donate his personal collection of 30,000 books to Cornell. But instead of putting the books into the library’s collections, White wanted his books installed in a special library within Uris Library. He asked the architect, William Henry Miller, to design it. A.D. White Library opened as Uris Library opened. The library is also filled with White’s other collections of artworks, furniture and artifacts that he got from Europe when he was the U.S. Ambassador for Germany and Russia. There are paintings, plaster busts and several plaster casts of European coins and medallions that are placed in a glass case. Uris Library is open from Thursday to Sunday for 24 hours  for students who want to use the facility. Get that? Open for 24 hours.

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

A. D. White Library is a small library. Its location is rather secluded. We climbed some steps and reached a big door. My friend opened it and we entered another realm. We were floored! We were amazed! My kids were very enthusiastic and in a hushed voice telling me,”This is like Harry Potter’s Library!” There are 3 tiers in the library that were made from wrought iron. These tiers themselves are a work of art. The sun rays that beamed into the room reflected upon the iron frames, fell on the chairs and leather sofa that are placed in front of the windows. The atmosphere was solemn, peaceful and simply just wonderful. It’s very accommodating for whoever needs a place to study. I think I could really enjoy studying there for as long as I want.

Andrew Dickson White Library

Andrew Dickson White Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Andrew Dickson White's Library

Travel Journal: Stopping by at a Victorian Cafe

Located in the town of Corning, a town in the Upstate New York, which famous with producing glass kitchenware, is a pretty cafe called THE OLD WORLD CAFE & ICE CREAM. We visited Corning when we came to Ithaca to see Cornell University. This town is a charming town with lots of interesting things to see. During our stop at the town’s downtown area know as the Gaffer District, we walked around enjoying the scenery which is mostly decorated with historical architectures, wonderful galleries and pretty shops. Then because we’re hungry, we tried to pick places to eat and we came upon the Old World Cafe and Ice Cream. The cafe is located at the bottom floor of the Baron Steuben Place Building that was opened  in 1926. The building was named after Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben who was  Prussian-born who later became George Washington’s aide during the American Revolutionary War.

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

 

The Old World Cafe exuded the charm of a Victorian-style cafe. As soon as we got inside, we were taken to the beauty of yesteryear through the display of chairs, tables, wooden benches, rows of glass jars filled with candy and chocolates and the counters which were serving ice cream and several choices of foods. Behind each of the counter there were beautiful giant mirrors with amazing carved wooden frames. The carved ornaments were just breathtaking. Not to mention the lights from the sun that shined into the cafe added a natural light that was captivating. The old-style glass jars that were arranged on the counters were another of a special touch that made this cafe a destination when you visit Corning.

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

 

From the ceiling to the walls, the furniture, the tiles, the wallpaper and the displays on the shelves at the Old World Cafe brought us to Victorian era. I personally love the wooden benches at the cafe with a built-in-table that had beautiful mosaic decoration. The benches and the table were set up in a stall that was adorable. The combination of the ornamented ceiling, the floral themed wallpaper, the wonderful light fixtures, the marble counter top and the stools for people who want to have some ice creams and the knick-knacks added the charm to the cafe. It seems that if I have to tell you about this cafe, I might  be overdoing it because I simply fell in love with it. Oh, how about the food? Well, the foods that we ordered were delicious. I had a bowl of cheesy chicken noodle soup and Greek salad, while my family had some turkey sandwhiches and my kids also had a big cream puff with ice cream. It’s to die for!

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

The Old World Cafe & Ice Cream

Foods at Old World Cafe  & Ice Cream

Foods at Old World Cafe  & Ice Cream

Foods at Old World Cafe  & Ice Cream

The Stained-Glass Windows at Battell Chapel

Battell Chapel is the largest chapel in the of New Haven in Connecticut. I’ve been to this chapel several times to see my daughters practicing with their orchestras and during their performances. From the outside, Battell Chapel looks like another ordinary stone building in downtown New Haven, the first planned city in America. New Haven became a city in 1784 and thrived because of Yale College, the 3rd oldest college in United State. Battell Chapel was established through donations of Joseph Battell and his family who dedicated the chapel as a memorial for the Civil War. The style of the chapel is High Victorian Gothic and designed by Russell Sturgis, Jr.

Alright, enough about the history and some facts about Battell Chapel. I love being inside the chapel admiring the glass works that are shown around it. The designs, motifs and colors of the stained-glass windows are stunning. I usually didn’t stay inside while waiting for my daughter practicing, but the last time the orchestra had a rehearsal, I tried to take as many pictures as possible of the stained-glass windows. My favorites are the windows that I’m putting first in this journal. Among the stained-glass windows that adorned Battell Chapel, one of them was created by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the master of the stained-glass art (the last picture).

Battell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass Windows<

Battell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass WindowsBattell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass WindowsBattell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass WindowsBattell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass WindowsBattell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass WindowsBattell Chapel Stained-glass Windows

Battell Chapel Stained-glass Windows